Tag Archives: The Washington Post

Listening to Vineet Jain’s and Rahul Joshi’s cringe-worthy speeches welcoming Narendra Modi, you are left with only one doubt: was the text approved by the Prime Minister’s Office or its propaganda division, Niti Aayog?

“After #Pulwama, the Indian media proves it is the BJP’s propaganda machine“ This was the headline of an article in the Washington Post, on March 4, by two researchers of The Polis Project, who looked at the “contradictory, biased, incendiary and uncorroborated” reports in a number of media vehicles including India Today, NDTV, News 18, The…

WaPo, Amazon, HT, and the Reliance-TV18 deal

There was plenty of buzz about the Washington Post building being sold to shore up the books. But when the paper’s staff was convened for a meeting on the afternoon of August 5, they were in for a shock: the family-owned newspaper itself was being sold. The sale, to Jeff Bezos, the founder of Amazon.com,…

Manmohan, Washington Post & The Caravan

The Washington Post article on prime minister Manmohan Singh, by its India bureau chief Simon Denyer, has stirred up yet another media tsunami, after Time magazine’s “Underachiever” cover. The government’s media handlers have gone into a tailspin, demanding an “apology” from the Post, even labelling it “yellow journalism”, while the government’s detractors are celebrating another…

Hu, Wen and why China scorns Indian media

When the Chinese premier Wen Jiabao visited India in December 2010, he was critical of the Indian media, saying it repeatedly sensationalised the border situation, causing damage to bilateral ties. He even lectured a group of editors to play a more active role in enhancing friendship between the two countries. However, when the Chinese president…

‘Complacent US media can learn from India’

S. Mitra Kalita, the US-born Indian-American who did a two-year stint at the business daily Mint before returning to the Wall Street Journal, has just done a book on her Indian experience, titled My Two Indias. In an interview with Aseem Chhabra of India Abroad, the “daughter of Assam”, shares her thoughts on Indian journalism:…

‘Talking’ ads in The Hindu and The Times of India

Two leading Indian newspapers—The Hindu and The Times of India—have notched up a global first of sorts by carrying a “talking advertisement” two days in a row. The pathbreaking ad, which first featured in the Madras edition of yesterday’s Hindu, now finds space in today’s ToI in its Bangalore, Bombay, Poona and Delhi markets. ***…

When editor makes way for editor, gracefully

The change of editorship at Indian publications is (usually) a graceless cloak-and-dagger affair, done in the dead of night after the janitors have left the building. Media consumers are rarely ever told why the helmsman has left or why a new one has come in, especially when there is a cloud shrouding the midnight operation.…

The ‘troubling nexus’ doesn’t trouble too many

Several Indian newspapers which have tie-ups with the New York Times have re-run Heather Timmons‘ piece on people of Indian origin returning to the United States because they find it difficult to work in the motherland. Surprise, surprise—or perhaps no surprise, no surprise—almost all of them have excised former Mint editor, currently Washington Post managing…

Why did the editor cross Kasturba Gandhi Marg?

So, why did Raju Narisetti suddenly leave Mint, the business Berliner launched by the Hindustan Times group, in December 2008, less than two years after the newspaper’s launch, and return to the United States? *** # Was it because he was opposed to staff and salary cuts as proposed by the management, as insiders claimed?…

Shashi Tharoor ain’t the only Tweetiya in town

Indian minister Shashi Tharoor isn’t the only one getting into trouble with his Twitter updates. Indian-born journalist Raju Narisetti too is. The former editor of the business daily Mint, now a managing editor at The Washington Post looking after features and its website, has fallen foul of the paper’s ombudsman Andrew Alexander for his tweets…

Will journalism soon be Twitterature in a hurry?

Monica Hesse of The Washington Post has gleaned some advice from authors of forthcoming books on Twitter how to get the best out of 140 characters allowed in each Tweet: # Make It Participatory: Use discussion and self-reflecting, philosophical questions, rather than simple questions like “What are you doing?” # Make it Art: Each Tweet…

Shankar Vedantam named Nieman fellow

Shankar Vedantam, a national science reporter at The Washington Post, has been named among 24 American and international journalists to join the 72nd class of Nieman fellows at Harvard. Bangalore-born Shankar will “study solutions to collective action problems and explore how online social networks might solve public policy challenges. He also will study how perceptions…

Ditto and likewise in India and elsewhere

Kathleen Parker in The Washington Post: “The biggest challenge facing America’s struggling newspaper industry may not be the high cost of newsprint or lost ad revenue, but ignorance stoked by drive-by punditry. “Drive-by pundits are non-journalists who have been demonizing the media for the past 20 years or so and who blame the current news…

‘Investors no longer care who the editor is’

The Washington Post has a new executive editor, former Wall Street Journal managing editor Marcus Brauchli. Newsweek asked John Morton, a newspaper industry analyst, on how Wall Street would view Brauchli’s ascension to the top job: “I don’t think Wall Street gives a crap about who the editor of anything is anymore. They’re not interested in…

All the memories, memorials, memorabilia

Newseum, the revamped 250,000-square foot light-filled monument to five centuries of journalistic self-glorification, opens in Washington DC this Friday, and Howard Kurtz of The Washington Post bungs in the glory of the story above the fold, calling it “dazzling, innovative and absorbing” but overpriced. Three times the size of the earlier Newseum, the museum’s six…

24 hours, six TVs, one laptop, two radios…

This is the age of the information overload. Gone is the top-down, one-way, take-it-or-leave-it hierarchy of the past. News, views and juice now bombards the reader, listener, viewer, surfer. Scores of voices plead, rant, shout to catch your attention as the dissemination of fact and opinion no longer remains the sole province of people with…