Tag Archives: The Economist

From ‘what’ to ‘why’ and ‘what’s next’: four ways in which robots and Artificial Intelligence will change journalism in the future, according to Bloomberg News’ editor-in-chief

From Johannes Gutenberg‘s printing press to Tim Berners Lee‘s world wide web, and the telegram, radio and television in between, journalism has been constantly shaped and changed by technology—and not always for the worse. In the 21st century, the news media business is grappling, like other industries, with the prospect of machine learning and Artificial…

Hindu Business Line redesigned by Aurobind Patel

In its 20th year of publication, Business Line, the business daily from The Hindu stable, has gone in for a relaunch, accompanied by a redesign. In the image above are the front pages of the paper the day before (left) the new design (right) was unveiled on Thursday, January 23. Writes BL editor Mukund Padmanabhan…

If The Economist looks at Tamil Nadu, it’s news?

In a bleak advertising scenario, Indian magazines have been pushed into running cheap and ugly advertisements, advertorials, and other intrusions dressed up as thinly disguised “innovations”, like a bit of editorial here for an ad elsewhere, to keep the ship afloat. But The Economist, too? The latest issue of the “newspaper” (as the magazine calls…

The role of the press in India-China relations

In which, The Economist, London sounds no different from the average bankrupt politician who blames the media for all his ills, as if India-China relations would have been a bed of roses if there were no newspapers, television, websites or magazines: “The National University of Singapore this month convened a workshop on the role of…

‘China Daily’ hands back occupied areas to India

Tongue firmly in cheek, James Fallows of The Atlantic Monthly (a one-time resident of Beijing) calls it “the world’s finest daily”. Two weeks ago it began to appear on the streets of the United States. Now, “China Daily” has spread its wings to India. A 24-page edition of the weekly tabloid, printed in Hong Kong…

EPW, the ‘Economist’ of emerging countries?

The former West Bengal finance minister, economist and left ideologue, Ashok Mitra, in The Telegraph, Calcutta: “Gentlemen do not engage in public brawl; if they have a grievance to air, they write to the London Times. That was the British code…. The Indian gentry, as could only be expected, inherited the code of the ruling nation….  For…

How ‘New York Times’ stumped India’s censors

Foreign publications usually get into a kerfuffle with superpatriotic Indian authorities over the depiction of the geographical boundaries of India in maps and infographs. Publications like The Economist, for instance, have noisily run afoul of censors for (corrrectly) showing parts of Kashmir as belonging to Pakistan and China. The New York Times which recently launched…

The Indian Express, Reliance and Shekhar Gupta

The shadow of Mukesh Ambani‘s Reliance Industries (RIL) has hung heavily over the northern editions of the Indian Express for the last seven years, in a marked departure from the late 1980s when Ramnath Goenka‘s paper was seen as Dhirubhai Ambani‘s chief  bully and bugbear. Tongues have wagged incessantly about how well paid Express staffers are…

The Indian Express stands up for The Economist

The censorship of foreign magazines and newspapers depicting the “wrong” map of India is as old as the hills and barely makes news. Certainly, no Indian newspaper finds it worth its while to stand up for the “erring” firang. But the Indian Express, which is in a content sharing partnership with The Economist and prints…

Thrice bitten, will FT find love after 20 years?

PRITAM SENGUPTA writes from New Delhi: For a newspaper that likes to think it is the handbook for global executives on how to run their businesses, Financial Times hasn’t quite had a textbook entry into India. Twenty years ago, when the doors of the economy were opened ajar and the rumours of the iconic British…

Censored, but no copies have been confiscated

Since January 2009, India has “censored” The Economist “newspaper” 31 times, mostly for its depiction of Kashmir in its maps. Usually, newsstand copies are more at risk of attracting the “illegal stamp” against subscription copies. Image: courtesy The Economist Link via Boing Boing Also read: If it catches your eye, surely the ad’s working? Funny…

Why Chinese children are learning Hindi

Indian publishers are relentlessly cutting expenditure. Meanwhile, The Economist “newspaper”—one of the few profitable publications even during the downturn—unveils its maiden television campaign in India. View another Economist TVC here Link via Chetan Krishnaswamy *** Also read: If it catches your eye, surely the ad’s working? Funny joke from a balding journalist-blogger* How to get…

Who, why, when, how, where, what, what the…

The new, redesigned Newsweek has had plenty of what can only be mildly termed “negative fan following”. The designer Juan Antonio Giner wrote recently that it was time to “forget Newsweek“. “It’s irrelevant. Awful design. Cheap opinions. No reporting. No news. No quality. No necessary content. And… a newsroom of hundreds. For what? Fat newsroom…

If it catches your eye, surely the ad’s working?

A screenshot of The Economist‘s advertising on the Indian TV station NDTV’s relaunched website, NDTV.com. The other advertisements take the attention away somewhat, but the English headlines in a Russian-looking font (“Journalists stopped by Great Wall of China”, “Indian children increase unemployment in China,” “Russian billionaires in debt to Kremlin”) grab the eye while underlining…

Funny joke from a balding journo-blogger*

David Finkelstein in The Times, London: An economist-friend has just told me a wonderful story about a professional colleague of his. The colleague was waiting at the airport for his flight to be called when a man ran into his section of the lounge, slightly out of breath. “Is there an economist in here?” he…

Yes, the market is growing, but best practices?

An article in The Economist, London, juxtaposes the growing disconnect between a flourishing media in India and its heavy dependence on advertisers: “More than 350 million literate Indians do not yet subscribe to a newspaper, which, coupled with rising literacy, promises a long-term boom. A recent report by PricewaterhouseCoopers estimated that India’s print industry would…

‘The TV satellite is mightier than the ICBM’

From The Economist obituary of Sir Arthur C. Clarke: “In 1962, at the chilliest part of the cold war and just after the launch of Sputnik had heralded the space age, he discussed in ‘Profiles of the Future‘ the implications of transatlantic satellite radio and television broadcasts, with information raining down on previously isolated parts…