Monthly Archives: November 2010

‘The Pioneer’ journo who brought Raja to book

So, who gets the credit for the resignation, at long last, of Union telecommunications minister A. Raja in the 2G spectrum allocation scam? The Pioneer, Delhi, has put its hand up–first. Its front-page lead story today says: “Two years after The Pioneer first exposed the 2G spectrum scam, pegged at Rs 1.70 crore by the…

‘Indian Media lost all balance during Obama trip’

E.R. RAMACHANDRAN writes: The visit of the 44th president of the United States of America, Barack Obama, and his wife, Michelle, was covered by the Indian media in a way reserved historic occasions like the sinking of the Titanic or the invention of penicillin would have been, if only there was 24×7 television. Everything else…

Swamy and Friends: a very, very short story

As the 2G spectrum allocation scam hits the ceiling once again, the original gadfly of Indian politics, Subramanian Swamy, the Harvard-educated national president of the Janata Party, with a daughter in the TV business, sends a Twitter response to a follower on the media mavens whose names allegedly figure in tapped conversations of PR honcho…

India’s important businessman meets Obama

There were at least 200 guests—ministers, bureaucrats, businessmen, media mavens, et al—at Indian president Pratibha Patil‘s banquet for her visiting American counterpart, Barack H. Obama. Among the tycoons present were Mukesh Ambani and Ratan Tata, and Rahul Bajaj and Sunil Mittal. But two Delhi newspapers, The Indian Express (top) and The Times of India, agree…

Who said good journalism can’t be good business?

The brand managers and consultants in the English media will harangue you that scams and scandals don’t pay. That bad news is, well, bad news. That populating your pages with happy, smiling faces with fell-good stories of success, wealth and achievement is the way to greet readers first thing in the morning. Maybe, but there’s…

Strangely, readers don’t spot the dollar sign

The interpretation of news and views by readers is a pretty straightforward affair. But how do they “read” images? Above is the cartoon that The Hindu‘s Keshav drew at the end of US president Barack Obama‘s three-day visit to India on Tuesday, 9 November. Below, are a set of three responses to it, published by…

‘Indian TV in grip of a small, incestuous clique’

The Booker Prize winning author-turned-activist Arundhati Roy in an interview with The Times of India Crest edition: Q: Does the Indian media offer sufficient space for dissenting voices? A: Much of the mainstream media has been captured by a small clique of columnists, editors and TV anchors, an incestuous little coterie with shows on each…

Why Aroon Purie ‘elevated’ Prabhu Chawla

After being badgered left, right and centre online for his jetlag-inspired plagiarism, India Today editor-in-chief Aroon Purie finally gets some old-fashioned good press, courtesy the “dirty old man of Indian journalism”. Khushwant Singh uses a session on the couch with Headlines Today host Koel Purie Rinchet to throw light on her father and grandfather Vidya…

The PTI journo who scooped Obama interview

For weeks ahead of US President Barack Obama‘s full visit to India in his first term in office, speculation was who would get the prized pre-tour interview. The buzz was that The Times of India would get the print interview given its reach, while NDTV would get the television interview. NDTV’s Prannoy Roy was said…

‘Plagiarists speed up the spread of knowledge’

R. Jagannathan, the executive editor of DNA, offers an extraordinary, pinch-yourself, hope-he’s-being-sarcastic defence of plagiarism in today’s paper: “Now that the buzz has died down, it is time to sit back and look at the whole issue of plagiarism with fresh eyes. I’m sure Aroon Purie, editor-in-chief of India Today, is embarrassed that his lines…

The writing is on the wall for the print media

The findings of the national youth readership survey carried out by the national council for applied economics research (NCAER) on what occupies the mindspace of Indians between 13 and 35 years of age. The survey, conducted for the national books trust, had a sample size of 38,575 literate youths in 199 towns and 432 villages…

Don’t forget, the ads are of use to you, too

VINUTHA MALLYA forwards an item spotted in the ‘Ahmedabad Talking’ section of Ahmedabad Mirror dated 1 November 2010: *** There are only ads. Where’s the news?  “Lately, I have noticed that there plenty of advertisements in Mirror, but hardly any news. The paper has become quite boring. Please do something. ” — Dvip Patel, by email RESPONSE…